GTC Astronomical Images Gallery

 

Object Name:
Messier 74 with Supernova SN2013ej
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), I (770nm), OS657 (657nm, FWHM 35nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (I), Bright-red (OS657)
Date:
August 6th, 2013
Exposure:
2x10secs (G, R and I), 2x20sec (OS657)
Field of View:
Approx. 8' x 8'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 1h36m42s
Dec(J2000.0) = +15°47'00"
M74 is a very nice example of so-called "grand-design" spiral galaxy. It's spiral arms can clearly be seen. This galaxy has a distance of 25 million light years and is quite bright, so that it can even be seen with a small telescope. To make this image a filter was used to bring out emission lines of clouds of Hydrogen gas that is show here as bright red spots. In many of these clouds new stars are being formed. On July 25th 2013 a very bright supernova was discovered in this galaxy. Since this image was taken a few days later the supernova can be seen, as is indicated by the arrow. A supernova is a violent explosion of a star at the very end of its life. Hence this image captures the very beginning and end of the life cycle of stars, all in a distant galaxy.

 


 

Object Name:
Sharpless 2-106
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), Z (970nm), OS657 (657nm, FWHM 35nm), OS902 (902nm, FWHM 40nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (Z). OS657 and OS902 were added as luminance to get resolution
Date:
UT July 14th, 2010
Exposure:
3x30secs (G, R and Z), 2x30sec (OS657), 60seg (OS902)
Field of View:
Approx. 3.0' x 3.5'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 20h27m27s
Dec(J2000.0) = +37°22'39"
Known as Sharpless 2-106, the hourglass-shaped (bipolar) nebula is a stellar nursery made up of glowing gas and light-scattering dust. The material shrouds a natal high-mass star thought to be mostly responsible for the hourglass shape of the nebula due to high-speed winds which eject material from the forming star deep within. Research also indicates that many sub-stellar objects are forming within the cloud and may someday result in a cluster of 50 to 150 stars in this region.

 


 

Object Name:
M1, The Crab Nebula
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), I (770nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (I)
Date:
UT November 11th, 2010
Exposure:
4x30secs (G), 3x30sec (R and I)
Field of View:
Approx. 7.0' x 7.0'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 05h34m32s
Dec(J2000.0) = +22°00'52"
The Crab Nebula (M1) is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula in the constellation of Taurus. At the center of the nebula lies the Crab Pulsar, a neutron star (or spinning ball of neutrons), which emits pulses of radiation from gamma rays to radio waves with a spin rate of 30.2 times per second. The nebula was the first astronomical object identified with a historical supernova explosion. The nebula acts as a source of radiation for studying celestial bodies that occult it.

 


 

Object Name:
NGC7635, The Bubble Nebula
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), Z (970nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (Z)
Date:
UT Aug. 24th, 2010
Exposure:
3x5secs (G, R and Z), 3x30sec (G, R and Z)
Field of View:
Approx. 7.0' x 8.0'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 23h20m48s
Dec(J2000.0) = +61°12'06"
NGC 7635, also called the Bubble Nebula, is a H II region emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia. The "bubble" is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot young central star, the 15 solar masses SAO 20575. The nebula is near a giant molecular cloud which contains the expansion of the bubble nebula while itself being excited by the hot central star, causing it to glow.It was discovered in 1787 by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel.

 


 

Object Name:
NGC 5395 and NGC 5394, Arp 84
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), I (770nm), OS657 (657nm, FWHM 35nm), OS902 (902nm, FWHM 40nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (I), OS657 and OS902 were added as luminance to get resolution
Date:
UT June 26th, 2011
Exposure:
3x30secs (G, R and I), 2x30sec (OS657), 60seg (OS902)
Field of View:
Approx. 6.0' x 7.0'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 13h58m34s
Dec(J2000.0) = +37°27'11"
NGC 5395 and 5394 , also known as Arp 84, are two interacting galaxies in the constellation Canes Venatici. The larger, NGC 5395, is at a distance 165 million light-years and NGC 5394 is 162 million light-years away. NGC 5394 is thought to have cart wheeled through NGC 5395, instead of a grazing encounter. Arp 84 is also known as the Heron Galaxy. The image shows a few dozen background galaxies.

 


 

Object Name:
M20, The Trifid Nebula
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), Z (970nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (Z)
Date:
UT April 6th, 2010
Exposure:
5x10secs (G and R), 2x10sec (Z). R applied with luminance
Field of View:
Approx. 8.0' x 8.0'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 18h02m23s
Dec(J2000.0) = -23°01'50"
The Trifid Nebula (M20) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. Its name means 'divided into three lobes'. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars, an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent 'gaps' within the emission nebula that cause the trifid appearance).

 


 

Object Name:
M51, Whirlpool Galaxy
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), Z (970nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (Z)
Date:
UT April, 2010
Exposure:
3x30secs (G, R and Z)
Field of View:
Approx. 9.0' x 7.5'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 13h29m53s
Dec(J2000.0) = +47°11'43"
M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, in Canes Venatici is famous for its beautiful spiral structure, was discovered by Messier in October 1773. The M51 system is a spectacular example of interacting galaxies - in this case NGC 5195 is being "ripped apart" by the huge gravitational disturbance of M51, while M51 has in turn undergone huge structural alteration from the gravitational effects of NGC 5195.

 


 

Object Name:
M56, Globular Cluster in Lyra
Telescope:
Grantecan / Nasmyth-B
Instrument:
OSIRIS
Filter:
G (481nm), R (641nm), Z (970nm)
Color:
Blue (G), Green (R), Red (Z)
Date:
UT July, 2010
Exposure:
3x30secs (G, R and Z)
Field of View:
Approx. 5.0' x 8.0'
Orientation:
North is up, east is left
Position:
RA(J2000.0) = 19h16m36s
Dec(J2000.0) = +30°11'00"
Messier 56 (M56) is located about half-way between Beta Cygni (Albireo) and Gamma Lyrae. It is one of the less bright Messier globulars, especially lacking the bright core which most globulars have. M56 was one of Charles Messier's original discoveries; he saw it first on January 23, 1779 and describes it as a "nebula without stars," like most globular clusters. It was first resolved into stars by William Herschel around 1784.

 


Last modified: 18 September 2013